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Science must always lead

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There is a quote that I have seen attributed to Neil deGrasse Tyson, it goes something like “The good
 
April 29 · Issue #88 · View online
Daily Brief
There is a quote that I have seen attributed to Neil deGrasse Tyson, it goes something like “The good thing about science is that it’s true whether or not you believe in it.” During this pandemic, it is even more evident. - Tefo

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There is no denying that one of the 2nd order or 3rd order effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) induced lockdowns is that earth is undergoing some level of reset. You see this with reports of less pollution in some of Africa’s large cities as well as (what we call) wild animals starting to venture out of their “camps.”
Another such reset that is long overdue is that where science leads the way and everything else follows.
At the frontlines of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic across Africa and literally saving lives and keeping us all alive are healthcare practitioners who are working with the support of other scientists to make decisions and keep us all alive. 📷 World Health Organization Africa Region
At the frontlines of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic across Africa and literally saving lives and keeping us all alive are healthcare practitioners who are working with the support of other scientists to make decisions and keep us all alive. 📷 World Health Organization Africa Region
Before the lockdowns around the world, our media was filled with what in hindsight appears as trivial things. Entertainment, sports, etc. The amount of money spent on these activities was also disproportionately high compared to the amount being spent on scientific research and development, especially in Africa.
Yet, when it is now time to ensure we can all survive and continue with our livelihoods it is the very scientists, in their various professions, that we rely on. However, under normal circumstances they are not the most well funded (as compared to your favourite sports team for example).
Don’t get me wrong. I am not saying things like music are useless. For one I would go insane for being confined to our house for such extended periods without listening to my favourite music artists. What I am trying to say is, especially in Africa where we donate more to churches than healthcare initiatives, we should re-evaluate our priorities. As Augustine Togonu-Bickersteth puts it:
“Since Jesus loved healing the sick, black churches should devote their resources to health care and health research.”
Ultimately, when all else is failing, it is science that leads the way.
Learn how to weather the storm and prepare for the innovation economy
An online event on 30 April 2020 at 6 PM (GMT+2) to help you navigate the current COVID-19 storm and how you can prepare yourself and your company to benefit from the innovation economy. Our keynote speaker will be Kamran Elahian, an Iranian-American entrepreneur who is the chairman and co-founder of Global Catalyst Partners ($350 million under management) with an international multistage, technology-oriented venture capital firm. GCP has invested in leading-edge technology companies (e.g. SoundHound) in the USA, China, Japan and Israel.

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On a lighter note, I couldn't resist putting together this poster.
On a lighter note, I couldn't resist putting together this poster.
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